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Where Will Bridge Take You?: Megan Grip, Bridge 2017

Where Will Bridge Take You?: Megan Grip, Bridge 2017

We recently checked in with Bridge alumni to see where they are now. This is the second profile in a series from the article, "A Strong Bridge to Business Leadership" published on Tuck News.

Undergraduate degree
Hamilton College 2019, B.A. Economics

Region
New York, NY

Career
Analyst at Goldman Sachs, NY


Megan Grip was in her second year at Hamilton when she learned about Bridge. As an economics major at a liberal arts college, Grip was enticed by the chance to apply her foundational knowledge to real-world business cases and concepts. “Bridge provided me the opportunity to learn more about everything in the business world—not only in the classroom and through the capstone project—but also through the career guidance programming,” she says. “Learning directly from Tuck professors and students really excited me.”

Grip sensed she wanted a career in the business world, but wasn’t aware of the options available to her. Through the alumni career panels, Bridge exposed Grip to many different fields and helped Grip narrow her focus to finance. Her preferences were revealed further during the corporate accounting course, where her professor walked the class through Walmart’s financial statements. “That was the first time I felt that the math and formulas I was learning in the classroom were directly applicable to real-world experiences. It was very eye opening, and I enjoyed it.”

The real-world learning continued in the capstone project, where Grip’s group evaluated Carnival Cruise Line. Grip’s role in the group was to pull the whole story together for the presentation, and that gave her a new appreciation for business strategy. The group ultimately decided Carnival was undervalued, and for Grip, that process proved to have lasting value. “Being able to look at Carnival’s financials and analyze them, and understand the firm’s strategy—and then wrap it up into the larger story for our presentation—that was the part that excited me the most and to this day I hone in on those skills during my everyday work,” she says.

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Where Will Bridge Take You?: J.B. Andreassi, Bridge 2012

Where Will Bridge Take You?: J.B. Andreassi, Bridge 2012

We recently checked in with Bridge alumni to see where they are now. This is the first profile in a series from the article, "A Strong Bridge to Business Leadership" published on Tuck News.

Undergraduate degree
Dartmouth College 2012, B.A. History

Region
Long Island, NY

Career
Licensed real estate broker with Nest Seekers International, Southampton, NY


A three-year starter on Dartmouth’s football team, J.B. Andreassi D'12, Bridge '12 chose to attend Bridge right after graduation and before he started working for the NHL in New York. “I figured it would be smart to get on the fast-track to business knowledge,” he says. “I was excited to be a part of it, and I couldn’t be happier that I did it.”

For his study group’s capstone project, they chose to study JetBlue. It was Andreassi’s first big presentation in a business setting, and he was a little nervous, but it went well. He focused on the marketing and branding of the company, and he immediately put his new skills to use in the NHL’s corporate office, where he first worked on events like the All-Star Game and then switched to the marketing department. There, he oversaw accounts such as Miller-Coors and Honda, who were promoting their brand through the NHL’s platform. “A lot of the tools I learned going through that presentation I applied directly to the business world in real life,” he says.

As the son of a real estate developer in the Hamptons, Andreassi decided to go into the family business. In 2019, the luxury real estate firm Nest Seekers hired him as a broker, and then the CEO of the company thought Andreassi would be a good fit for a role on the reality show Million Dollar Beach House he was co-producing with Netflix. They shot the first season from June to September, and the show aired on Netflix in August of this year, ranking as the second most popular series for more than a week. “What I cared about was the business side of things, and getting a competitive advantage,” Andreassi says. “Buyers are calling me from around the country now.”

Looking back at his Bridge experience, what stands out the most was the accessibility to the professors and mentors, and the ability to collaborate with a diverse cohort of young and intelligent people. He still keeps in touch with members of his study group, some of whom went on to work at Bain Consulting and Facebook. “Bridge really paid off for me and the others in my program,” he says.

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Where Will Bridge Take You?: Lesley Chin, Bridge 2003

Where Will Bridge Take You?: Lesley Chin, Bridge 2003

We recently checked in with Bridge alumni to see where they are now. This is the sixth profile in a series from the article, "A Strong Bridge to Business Leadership" published on Tuck News.

Degrees
Harvard College 2005, B.A. Latin American Studies
MBA, Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, 2013

Region
Seattle, WA

Career
Senior Product Manager at Amazon

Lesley Chin T’13 knew she wanted to pursue a business career after she graduated from Harvard, but since she had a liberal arts background she felt she needed further grounding in business theory and practical skills. “Bridge offered me an introduction to those things, as well as a business perspective that built upon my general knowledge, better equipping me for a business career,” she says.

What she also noticed was that spending nearly a month at Tuck provided an excellent preview of the MBA experience, and it influenced her to come back to Hanover to pursue her MBA.

During her time at Bridge, Chin felt stretched — extending her skills beyond theory and into practice. For example, she recalls the MarkStrat simulation from Bridge’s Marketing course, where she had to put marketing skills into action in simulating a product launch. And it was something she experienced again as an MBA student, with the benefit of her additional skills gained in the workplace after college.

After Bridge, Chin went into consulting, and she has reflected that Bridge gave her the concrete and practical skills to succeed in that role. It also confirmed for her the path that she had chosen, and has guided her in her career ever since. “My experience at Bridge allowed me to assess both when and where to pursue an MBA, which ultimately led me back to Tuck,” she says. “That decision to return, which was founded in Bridge, has given me strong strategic thinking that I still use on a daily basis in my work.”

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Where Will Bridge Take You?: Jesse Laflamme, Bridge 1999

Where Will Bridge Take You?: Jesse Laflamme, Bridge 1999

We recently checked in with Bridge alumni to see where they are now. This is the fifth profile in a series from the article, "A Strong Bridge to Business Leadership" published on Tuck News.

Undergraduate degree
Bates College 1999, B.A. Political Science

Region
New England

Career
Owner and CEO of Pete and Gerry’s Organics


Jesse Laflamme loved the liberal arts education he received at Bates. But he got a little worried when he saw older classmates struggle to find their place in the business world, and he didn’t know what his Political Science degree qualified him to do.

He grew up on his family’s egg farm in Monroe, New Hampshire but hadn’t really planned to go back there to help run it. He saw a Bridge poster at Bates and decided to enroll the summer after his junior year. 

Immediately, Laflamme knew he had made the right choice. “I remember calling my dad two days into the program, saying how much I loved what was being taught, and that I now loved business,” he recalls. “I’m not generally an excitable person, but I was genuinely excited about Bridge.”

His family’s farm had been struggling to survive, and Bridge gave Laflamme the confidence to try to turn it around. He started working there right after Bridge finished, armed with the textbooks he had just used, including one on accounting by Tuck/Bridge professor Clyde Stickney. He consulted that book when he began revolutionizing the accounting practices at the business. 

At the time, the farm mostly sold mostly to small local customers, and had just a couple of employees and a few hundred thousand dollars in annual sales. Twenty years later, with Laflamme at the helm, the picture is vastly different. Now it has a national distribution network at supermarkets, and partners with 130 family farms. And it has 240 employees, $240 million in annual sales, and is considered one of the top-10 organic brands in the nation, alongside Horizon Organic, Stonyfield, and Organic Valley. 

“I’ve used every ounce of my Bridge experience to build Pete and Gerry’s into what it is today,” Laflamme says. “I didn’t have time to get an MBA, so I would have been lost without Bridge.”

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Where Will Bridge Take You?: Lauren Alpeyrie, Bridge 2010

Where Will Bridge Take You?: Lauren Alpeyrie, Bridge 2010

We recently checked in with Bridge alumni to see where they are now. This is the fourth profile in a series from the article, "A Strong Bridge to Business Leadership" published on Tuck News.

Degrees
Dartmouth College 2010, B.A. English Literature and Engineering
B.E., Thayer School of Engineering, 2011
MBA, Tuck School of Business 2017

Region
New York, NY

Career
Director of Innovation at PGIM Real Estate


As a double major in English and Engineering, Lauren Alpeyrie T’17 had a classic liberal arts education. Still, that didn’t mean she knew what she wanted to do after college. She decided to enroll in Bridge as a way to help her figure out her first move. “I had an early understanding of what different business careers entailed at the time,” she says. “For me, Bridge was a really valuable few weeks to understand alternatives to an engineering career or how they might complement each other.”

For her capstone project, Alpeyrie and her study group did a valuation of Blackberry. She appreciated the chance to work closely with a group of students and to apply everything she learned during the program. The experience also gave Alpeyrie a good perspective of business school and what it would be like to attend Tuck, where group work is a major component of the first-year curriculum.

After Bridge, Alpeyrie was hired as an associate by L.E.K. Consulting. She credits Bridge for awakening her to the world of consulting. “Bridge gave me a sense of what some careers would be like after college,” she says. “Without that understanding and the classes taught at Bridge, I wouldn’t have been as well prepared for that first job out of college.”

Alpeyrie decided to return to Tuck in 2015 for her MBA. There, she found other members of Tuck Bridge and Dartmouth who had enrolled, and that Bridge had given her an inside view of the content and culture of the school. Since then, she has participated in a career panel at Bridge and other interviewing efforts, and she notes how involved fellow Tuckies have been.  “It’s nice to have that community of people who see the immense value of the program and want to stay in touch with the school,” she says.

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Where Will Bridge Take You?: Jackson New-Smith, Bridge 2019

Where Will Bridge Take You?: Jackson New-Smith, Bridge 2019

We recently checked in with Bridge alumni to see where they are now. This is the third profile in a series from the article, "A Strong Bridge to Business Leadership" published on Tuck News.

Undergraduate degree
Santa Clara University 2019, B.A. Communications

Region
Chicago, IL

Career
Trainee of Baseball Operations at the Chicago Cubs


Jackson New-Smith was born and raised in San Francisco and is a rare example of someone who knew in high school which industry they’d end up in. A baseball fan, New-Smith got a job in high school as a clubhouse attendant and bat boy with the San Francisco Giants. During college, he worked for the Commissioner’s Office of Major League Baseball, and when he graduated in the spring of 2019, he went to work for the Tampa Bay Rays.

There was just one thing missing. “I had never gotten the academic foundation I needed to really have a full grasp of the landscape I was operating in,” he says. Some mentors and former colleagues had attended Bridge and recommended it, and the winter session in 2019 lined up perfectly with baseball’s offseason. Just before he flew out to Hanover for Bridge, he interviewed for a position with the Chicago Cubs, and he got an offer while Bridge was in session.

Bridge turned out to be the perfect preparation for his new role in baseball operations with the Cubs, where he would work on the team’s budget, player salaries, collective bargaining, trades, waivers and transactions. “Bridge provided me with the critical thinking and analytical thinking skills that I hadn’t practiced in college,” he says. “And the opportunity to engage in the case method, work in group dynamics, problem solve and present was just an awesome experience.”

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Bridge Builders

Bridge Builders

BUSINESS BRIDGE SCHOLARSHIP FUND ENDOWED FOR FIRST-GENERATION DARTMOUTH STUDENTS 
A new scholarship fund endowed by Walter Freedman D’60, T’61 and Karen Harrison will help first-generation Dartmouth students transitioning to business careers.

Walter Freedman D’60, T’61 and his wife Karen Harrison have always looked for ways to maximize the effect of their philanthropy. The key, Freedman says, is to find the places where need and potential intersect. That’s what drew their attention to Business Bridge, a program of Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business designed that helps students and new graduates at liberal arts colleges transition to careers in business.

“What we see in the Bridge program is a highly successful program that’s been in existence for more than 20 years,” says Freedman. “It’s the preeminent program of its type in the country and perhaps the world.”

Freedman and Harrison recognized, however, that many excellent candidates couldn’t afford to take advantage of the program. And while some financial aid was available to Bridge students, the program lacked an endowed scholarship fund. It was there that the couple recognized the chance to make a significant and lasting impact. “We saw an opportunity to make that program available to young Dartmouth students who otherwise would not have a prayer of going there,” he says.

The couple will endow a scholarship fund that gives preference to first-generation, low-income Dartmouth students who demonstrate leadership goals and potential. In planning the gift, they were inspired by Dartmouth’s Interim Dean of the College Kathryn Lively, herself a first-generation college graduate and a leader in Dartmouth’s efforts to attract qualified students who are among the first in their families to attend college. The college has worked diligently to welcome these students and remove barriers to their full participation in the Dartmouth experience. 

Opening opportunities in the Bridge program seemed like a logical next step, Freedman says. “I think it’s aptly named because the program can be a bridge to the business world for first-generation and low-income students. And of course I’m a Dartmouth graduate and a Tuck graduate, so this is kind of a bridge for me too,” Freedman says. “Today we talk about One Dartmouth commitment and One Dartmouth community, with a goal of creating a more diverse, inclusive, and welcoming climate. So for me, it all ties together.”

After Tuck, Freedman worked in a variety of executive positions. (“He’s had many, many careers,” Harrison interjects. “You’d think he couldn't keep a job but that's not the case at all.) Through 60 years in business, Freedman has always found an opening, whether in the vanguard of the computer age with IBM or the introduction of a little-known dairy product to the American market; Freedman was an investor and chief executive of the company that brought Yoplait yogurt to this country.

Now that he and his wife are in a position to give back, they’ve applied that entrepreneurial model to their philanthropy, with a particular emphasis on education. Harrison, who worked for 25 years as an educator, has served on the boards of the Chicago Children’s Museum and Facing History and Ourselves, an organization that provides teachers with the training and resources to confront racism, violence, and anti-Semitism.

The Tuck Bridge scholarship fits the goals and philosophy of their philanthropy, and the couple identifies with students who have the talent for a top-notch education but lack the means. Harrison had to take out loans to get through The Ohio State University, at a time when tuition and room and board amounted to about $1,500 a year. The average college graduate in the United States today owes more than $37,000 in student loans.

“That’s just insane for these kids to be burdened with that kind of debt,” Harrison says. “So we want to give our money to education, and we want to give it to the kids that really benefit the most.”

It’s a good feeling, Freedman says. “We’ve been encouraged by what we’ve heard from people at Dartmouth and at Tuck, because they expect a lot of students who could not do it any other way will be able to benefit from the Bridge program.”


By Jeff Moag
http://campaign.tuck.dartmouth.edu/bridge-builders?utm_source=capcamp&utm_medium=ccweb&utm_campaign=capcamp_ccweb_newsroom&utm_content=bridge

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Collaboration Builds the Bridge: Tuck Bridge

American motivational speaker and author Earl Nightingale once tweeted, “Your problem is to bridge the gap which exists between where you are now and the goal you intend to reach.” For many students at Dartmouth, their goals includes a career in business, but the College does not offer a business major. For many students, the Tuck Business Bridge program serves as the “bridge” towards a career in business. 

Tuck Bridge is operated by Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and caters to liberal arts students who wish to develop fundamental business skills. The program is not limited to Dartmouth students — rising juniors through graduating seniors from any college or university are eligible to apply. Tuck Bridge is offered three times a year: as two four-week-long sessions in the summer and one three-week-long session in December. Students accepted to the program live the life of a real MBA student, for a couple weeks at least.

Puja Devi ’19 participated in Tuck Bridge this past December. Devi decided to apply to the program after becoming interested in business during sophomore summer. She looked to Tuck Bridge to equip her with the skills needed to pursue her newfound interests. 

“I thought Tuck Bridge would be a really fantastic way of not only exploring the business field but also getting some credentials and gaining at least some sort of hard skills that would prepare me for internships and a job after graduation,” Devi said.

Tuck Bridge cultivates these business skills among participants by maintaining a busy schedule throughout the program. Participants are enrolled in a total of six core courses and several additional sessions throughout the program. Classes convene six days a week, leaving only Sunday free of activity. 

Rushil Shukla ’20 also participated in Tuck Bridge last December and appreciated the academic rigor the program provided.

“Classes … moved at a really fast pace and I really enjoyed that personally because I think that’s how we got so much out of the program … you are not going to get a ton out of the program if it is not intense because there is just so much to learn,” Shukla said. 

Classes are taught by notable members of the Tuck faculty, including business administration professor Leslie Robinson, who was named one of business news website Poets and Quants’ 40 best business school professors under the age of 40 in 2017. Robinson returned from teaching in France specifically to teach at Tuck Bridge in December. Having courses taught by Tuck professors is one of the key reasons why undergraduates are attracted to the progam.

“I just felt really respected and valued to be given that much time from a professor that teaches MBA students,” Devi said.

In addition to Tuck faculty, Tuck Bridge provides participants with guidance from Tuck MBA student coaches to help participants with their learning experience. Tuck professors and MBA students are available throughout the entire program to answer questions participants may have.

Shukla explained how MBA student coaches were helpful resources for undergraduate students. Tuck faculty and MBA student coaches are especially integral to assisting participants navigate the two culminating components of the program: the multi-round business simulation and the capstone valuation project. The multi-round business simulation challenges participants to compete in teams to grow a business using Markstrat, a digital marketing simulation. The simulation puts what participants learn throughout the program in perspective by testing their abilities to market and target products to consumers. 

The capstone valuation project tasks groups of participants with evaluating a company of their choice. Groups use the skills they learn throughout the program to analyze a company’s income statement, cash flow statement and balance sheet, among other things, and wholly evaluate the company. Each group then presents its findings to a panel of industry executives and Tuck faculty and gets constructive feedback.

“You really … get feedback from the best, and I think that’s what’s really special,” Shukla said. “The capstone project is the culminating experience that shows how far you’ve come.” 

The multi-round business simulation and capstone valuation project are just two aspects of Tuck Bridge that promote personal career development among participants. Tuck Bridge also offers networking opportunities, LinkedIn profile tutorials and résumé reviews throughout the program. 

“As someone who doesn’t know much about the business world, it was important to know how to present [myself] and not only build [an] image, but [know] how to use it to connect with other people,” Devi said.

Natalie Cantave ’16 served as a marketing intern for Tuck Bridge and recalls learning valuable marketing skills during her internship that she applies to her current marketing job in the greater Boston area. Cantave’s internship consisted of research and social media projects geared to market the program to her peers. Of the skills Cantave recalls obtaining through her internship, she flagged gaining a greater sense of confidenc, communication and creative skills as key takeaways from her experience.

Tuck Bridge has many aspects that make it a productive means for students to achieve their business goals, but the one overarching aspect of the program that makes it successful is  an emphasis on collaboration. Tuck Bridge is a collaborative program at its core. The liberal arts and business worlds join forces to develop practical skills in participants, groups of students work together to tackle challenging projects and undergraduate interns, MBA students and Tuck faculty ally to ensure the program runs smoothly. Collaboration builds this bridge. 

“I think after the program I can say with 100 percent certainty that business is definitely in the future for me,” Shukla said. “The kind of collaborative community … [Tuck Bridge] builds is very student-focused, it is really community centric and I think it is a community that really cares about each other. That came across in the program as something I was really attracted to.”

-- Annie Farrell, The Dartmouth
http://www.thedartmouth.com/article/2018/01/collaboration-builds-the-bridge-tuck-bridge
 

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